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While California government’s encroachment on local authority is nothing new, cities typically have more than 60 days to respond to legislation. Author of AB 243, Assemblyman Jim Wood who’s bill it was that set the deadline by mistake, has since issued an urgent legislation that is expected to pass the legislature for Governor Brown to sign. However the bill does not replace the March 1 deadline with another. Nonetheless cities around the foothills are taking the matter seriously so as to not fall under any type of State control on the matter.
No. A medical marijuana business may not operate until the City land use entitlement process is complete and the business has been properly permitted. The City is not currently issuing local permits to establish a medical marijuana business, but may begin to do so depending on the final outcome of the proposed medical marijuana ordinance amendments. It is anticipated amendments to current medical marijuana ordinances will likely be final in three to four months, after going through the public review process and undergoing CEQA analysis; however, there is no guarantee if or when these amendments will be adopted by the City Council.
I absolutely love Torrey Holistics! The customer service here is beyond anything I've ever experienced at another dispensary. Everyone at Torrey truly cares about you... read more and they want to make sure you find the right products for what you are looking for (pain, stress, anxiety, insomnia, etc.). I have tried all sorts of things here from flower to concentrates, edibles and tinctures and I have been happy every single time!
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“Our regulations currently are 170 pages of text of requirements, just for the bureau,” she said. “And then you look at them paying license fees, at the local level and at the state level, and our licensing fees range from $500 to over $120,000 every year. And then you add on the state cultivation tax and excise tax and the retail sales tax. And you see that the price of cannabis is going down, so they’re not making the profits they probably once were.”
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